Jukin’

I’m a digital guy. I grew up in front of computers. I have to have the newest and greatest gadgets as soon as possible.  I work in technology and spend a lot of my off time dicking around with the latest gizmo.

I like to keep a hand on the analog though.  I love the tactile experience of putting a record on the turntable. I love the hisses and pops and imperfections of music carved into a hunk of vinyl. I have an Echo Dot connected to the stereo in my shop where my lab lives and I do use it a lot, but I also like to spin up the turntable and drop the needle on classics not yet digitized, listen, and bask in the warmth.

My grandpa Orville had a float house on the Columbia river where he parked his boat when I was a lad. It was a magical place. A hang out space, a proto-mancave. There was a hardwood bar with bar stools, a pool table, a kegerator, a slot machine, and a 1947 AMI Model C jukebox. When Gramps passed,  the only thing I asked for was the jukebox. It was in very rough shape when I got it. The records were gone, parts were missing and it didn’t work. I’ve messed with it over the years and had it temporarily playing, but I’m not good enough with old electronics to have ever gotten it working stably.  This is a link to my youth, to the analog, and to good music only available on 78s.

I found a guy in Clackamas (about 10mi away)  who does restorations and just completed one of the exact same model! I’m going to look at his work, hopefully this weekend, and just sent him pictures of mine and the stacks of spare parts I’ve accumulated over the 10 years I’ve been working on it. It’s my most prized possession. I’m REALLY hoping his work is good and that he’ll take the job of doing mine!  It will go into my burgeoning hang out space in my shop, next to the popcorn maker, kegerator and stand up arcade machine.  Now if I can just talk my mom out if the slot machine.

Wish me luck! Here’s what it should look like when finished.

 

Why Today Is Important

Alan Turing is credited with crwating what we today know as the programmable computer. He had the idea before WWII, but work in earnest started in order to crack the “unbreakable” German Enigma machine’s encryption. They were used on U-boats which were destroying allied ships en-masse. Cracking their code would give locations to avoid and other vital information.

He worked in secret and never got credit for his work in his lifetime because it was still a state secret, though it saved thousands of lives. Many believe it to have been a big part of the reason the Germans surrendered.

He was discovered to be gay, a crime then, and penalized with chemical castration. He took his own life. He was posthumously pardoned in 2013 by the Queen. He is one of my biggest heroes and today is his birthday. Read a book on him or at least watch The Imitation Game. It’s pretty close to factual and you wouldn’t be reading this message if it weren’t for Turing.